Video Premiere: Polarnecks – “Dogs”

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Grungier outfit Polarnecks distill raw millennial angst into three minute noise pop gems, reminiscent of Dinosaur Jr.

The band is getting ready to release the PolarPricks EP, a split 10” with Grand Pricks, due out on July 14th via Gold Mold Records [pre-order], and today we have the pleasure to premiere the band’s video for the EP’s first single, “Dogs“.

According to vocalist/guitarist Lukas Clasen, “‘Dogs’ is about the realisation that only so much good can come out of analysing your issues. After a certain point it becomes unhelpful to dwell on problems – this dwelling can become a problem in itself. The chorus therefore likens personal issues to ‘sleeping dogs’, that are ‘best not disturbed’.” Watch the video below.

Playing a number of shows together and recording each other allowed the two groups to bond over a shared appreciation for 90s alt rock and the DIY ethos. The bands gradually became something of a unit, which is jokingly acknowledged with the collective moniker of ‘Polarpricks’.

According to the press release:

“The EP was recorded by Lewis Glass at Glassworks Studio,Glasgow. This represented a change in approach for both Grand Pricks or Polarnecks who had previously self-recorded,though working with Lewis proved to be a complete success.Balancing a high level of professionalism with his entrenched punk/DIY values, Lewis was able to bring out the best in both bands.

Grand Pricks begin proceedings with “En Fliqué” and “Don’t Vote”. “En Fliqué” deals with the modern cycle of compulsive technology use and the corresponding sense of self-curation and increased anxiety it fosters. ‘Don’t Vote’ is a reactionary protest song to the institutionalized nepotism displayed by the current British Government.

Polarnecks chose to record the songs “Pretty” and “Dogs”. “Pretty” is a song about social anxieties getting in the way of self-improvement, wanting to take risks and make bold choices in life but being held back by insecurity. “Dogs”, meanwhile, is about the realisation that only so much good can come out of analysing your issues. After a certain point it becomes unhelpful to dwell on problems – this dwelling can become a problem in itself. The chorus therefore likens personal issues to’sleeping dogs’, that are ‘best not disturbed'”.

COVER

 

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